Adopt Don’t Shop: 8 Reasons Why - They May Surprise You

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No doubt you’ve heard the phrase adopt don’t shop, and you may often wonder what that means. After all, when you adopt a dog through a rescue there are fees attached to that. So, isn’t that also shopping? I mean the dog isn’t free… When you rescue a dog, you are not buying a dog, you are rescuing it. At the same time, you are funding an organization, saving a life, and sometimes you are even keeping money out of the hands of people who are more concerned about making a profit off the lives of animals vs. considering their health and welfare.


Likewise, when you decide to buy a dog from a breeder, a pet store, a craigslist ad, a yard sale site, a backyard breeder…you are not adopting a dog. You are buying it! Your money is not going to fund a charity, or a help organization. It is not helping to remove dogs from shelters or keep them out of harm’s way. It is funding the future breeding efforts and financial gain of the person or organization selling the dog. Even worse, it could be funding a larger industry like the puppy mills who prey upon people’s lack of knowledge about a breed, and the conditions where they operate.

And no…please don’t say you are saving the dogs from the puppy mill. Supply and demand. If you continue to purchase from sources that will utilize these mills, you continue to unwittingly contribute to the problem.

In the rescue world we really want everyone to get the semantics right. It’s important that you understand what you are supporting when you “buy” a dog. You may be supporting a reputable dog breeder…but have you truly done your homework?

The Following are the 8 Reasons Why You Should Adopt Not Shop

Save a Life – Approximately 3.3 million dogs enter shelters each year nationwide according to the ASPCA. While not all are doomed to the fate of euthanizing, according to a study done by Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine approximately 780,000 dogs are euthanized in shelters per year. When you adopt through a shelter or rescue, you are helping to make it possible for as many dogs as can be saved, to live a wonderful life.

Breeding Shouldn’t be Done by Novices – The term is backyard breeders. Backyard breeders are often pet owners that want to make a few bucks by breeding their purebred pet, but actually have no knowledge about genetic health issues in the pet partners. If it seems like a bargain-basement price for a purebred there is probably a reason. Even if it’s not a bargain price, do your research on the breeder, the blood lines, the possible genetic disorders, and make sure you are well informed. Don’t just get that “cute purebred” you’ve always wanted because a litter is available.

Fund a Rescue and Save Even More Lives – When you adopt through a rescue, not only are you helping to save the life of the dog you are adopting, the money you pay toward adopting that dog will go toward helping to pull another dog to safety, vet that dog, and give that dog a chance at a wonderful life. And the cycle continues to free dogs from the threat of being euthanized.

25% of the dogs in Local Shelters are Purebreds – Owner surrender and even breeder surrender can be the cause of purebreds landing in shelters. Truly examine why you are looking for a purebred in the first place. Is it a necessity? And why? If it is, you can find purebreds when you go through shelters and rescues. It will be harder to verify, but is your plan to show the dog? To present its papers? Or is it because you’ve heard that a certain breed sounds like a perfect fit for your family?

1 in 10 – Only one out of every 10 dogs born will find a permanent home.  Rather than supporting those that will continually breed dogs, consider adoption and lets all hope this number will become more equal over time by the choices we make.

Don’t Support Puppy Mills – You’ve heard the term, but do you know what one is? This is a commercial dog-breeding facility that focuses on quantity and profits over the health and wellness of the dogs. Female dogs are bred repeatedly, with no breaks between litters, and are discarded to shelters or killed when they can no longer reproduce. An estimated 2.11 million puppies originate from puppy mills each year, and yet the conditions can be deplorable. Medical attention is atrocious. Food and water can be contaminated. Do not support the continued demand that allows these kinds of conditions to flourish. Being uninformed about where your purchased pooch is coming from supports the continuation of these inexcusable situations.

Purebred Health Risks – Purebred dogs, may look beautiful on the outside, but on the inside, there can be many issues depending on the breed, and the breeder that cause these dogs to have a short and sometimes painful life. These genetic issues have developed over the last two centuries when popular characteristics were desired, thus caused by inbreeding to get the desired results. Anything from hip dysplasia in labs, breathing problems in bulldogs, serious heart conditions or neurological disorders in King Charles Cavaliers, and the list goes on… to maintain purebred lines, there are often inbreeding practices that shorten the lifespan of your beautiful dog. Would you rather have a dog with papers that will live for 8-10 years (Or less) Or a healthy happy mutt that has a life of 14-17 years. (Remember no life span is guaranteed no matter the dog, but the quality of life for a dog is just as important as the quantity.)

The Emotional Rewards are Endless – There is just something about adopting a dog who has been dealt a bad hand, that can tug at your heart strings and make you feel happy every day that you made a difference in your 4-legged family member’s life. This is something that’s unquantifiable yet anyone who has ever rescued a dog can tell you, there is a level of emotional attachment, that comes with knowing this animal was lost, and now it is found. And in a happy, warm, and loving home. Often the rescues actually rescue us instead.

We hope you will consider adopting through Lu’s Labs, but if we don’t have the dog for you, please adopt through another reputable rescue, or shelter and give a dog a chance at life and love.

(Below is a helpful chart that everyone who breeds dogs should think about before breeding, it's also an eye opener for people who are considering buying a purebred and why.)

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