7 Reasons to Consider Adopting A Senior Dog

 Charlie, our available Senior at Lu's Labs

Charlie, our available Senior at Lu's Labs

“While some may call me a senior dog, I will just say that it means I have years of experience in the fine art of love and friendship,” Says Charlie, one of Lu’s Labs current senior dogs ready to find his forever home.

Charlie isn’t wrong. Adopting a senior dog can be one of the most rewarding things you do in your life. And not all seniors are created equally. Did you know that for labs, they are considered seniors around 7.5 years old? Yet many labs still have lots of energy at that age, and love to run and play. And lab mixes may have even more playful energy than their purebred friends. In many cases they still may have more than half their lives to live, and they are looking for a forever home that will love them just as much as a puppy.

1. Easy Going Energy

Often these older ladies and gentlemen come with a more laid-back life experience and are perfectly happy to perch on a couch, with a head in your lap and watch the world go by. While others may have a desire to run and jump and play!

2. Know Just Where to Go

Most older dogs have already learned the fine art of potty-training and will be a lot kinder to your floors. You may have to learn their cues to get the hang of when they want to go out, but often they are already in the know about indoors vs outdoors.

3. Your Wish is My Command

Older dogs don’t make it around the block a few times without learning a couple of basic commands. Often an older dog has had the opportunity to learn a little. And you know that old saying, “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?” That’s not true. An old dog will learn if you give him or her a chance. The same as with puppies, gentle, positive reinforcement training, a few treats, and soon your older dog will get the hang of things.

4. Happiness is Everything
Most of the time older dogs end up in shelters through no fault of their own. Some common reasons why seniors end up in shelters include the death of an owner, a move happens where the dog can’t follow, a new baby is in the family, someone has developed pet allergies, the loss of a job, or some kind of change in the family dynamics or schedules where someone no longer feels they can care for their dog. Finding a happy home for these dogs who have been removed from their own warm secure place, is more important than ever before. Knowing love, and then losing it can be just as hard as never having known it before. A shelter can become a very scary place for these lovable seniors.

5. You are Saving a Life

Dogs that fall on the older side have a much harder time getting adopted. Too many people come into it with a preconceived notion that they will have less time. Yet time stands still when you have a loving dog. Each day is a great day. And at the end of a dog’s life we shouldn’t weigh it by how much time we had, but how great that time was. That’s why it’s so rewarding to give an older dog a home.

6. Health and Wellness

Sometimes there is a stigma attached to older dogs that they may be costly in vet bills. But the truth is, dogs of all ages cost money throughout their lifetime. Young dogs can develop unforeseen issues just as easily as older dogs. And for highly active young pups there are possibilities of ACL tears and other injuries associated with heavy play, not to mention just about anything else under the sun. Having an honest assessment of a dog’s health as you adopt them will prepare you for the future costs of care. But remember, just like your kids and your own health, a dog will stay healthier if you work toward prevention and wellness before anything develops by keeping up healthy exercise, food, and proper doggy weight, and find out some of the key supplements and preventative actions you can take along the way. Make sure no matter the age of a dog you adopt, you always think about a reasonable budget for health along with the regular expenses, such as training, food, treats, toys, and other doggy essentials.

7. Age Has no Guarantees

Whether you adopt a puppy or a senior dog, there is no guarantee that they will live to a certain age.  With dogs, it’s not the number of years we have with them that’s important, it’s the quality of life we bring to each other. And with each dog that enters our lives, they leave a piece of their heart with us. The longer we live and the more dogs we have, the more our hearts will become dog hearts full of love and loyalty. The next time you see a senior dog in need of a home, think of the loving heart inside that dog, and how he or she can be a sweet addition to your family.

Next time you see a little grey in the chin and around the eyes that means this dog has lived, and you have the opportunity to help them grow older into their golden years. Senior dogs are rewarding, loving companions, that warm your heart and enhance your life. Don’t pass up the opportunity to help a senior.